baldrick0712
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Re: 2019-era LAPD Sidearm (aka. "Deckard's Blaster")

Fri 10 Jun 2022, 13:53

I think there's far less, if any, ambiguity about Leon's holdout pistol.
Other than the seeming fact that Tyrell has no security in place. Or, that Holden was sent out without any briefing from Bryant.
It will be interesting to see what other weapons are included in the rules. I suspect this real-life gun was selected as it looks a bit futuristic with the four separate barrels.

Someone shooting it...

Shooting COP 357 Derringer
 
paladin2019
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Re: 2019-era LAPD Sidearm (aka. "Deckard's Blaster")

Sat 11 Jun 2022, 00:22

Other than the seeming fact that Tyrell has no security in place.
That's an artifact of the early '80's. It sadly makes less sense viewed today.
 
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Vader
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Re: 2019-era LAPD Sidearm (aka. "Deckard's Blaster")

Mon 13 Jun 2022, 11:34

Someone should start a similar thread about the gun Leon shoots Holden with at the start of the original movie, which I believe was a 4 barrel COP357 derringer.

The Compact Off-duty Police .357 Derringer is indeed correct. Fun fact, though — the gun didn't officially enter production until 1983...

It might be noted that the prop gun was modified to discharge two barrels at once (upper right, lower left), to provide a more ... impressive muzzle flash (further enhanced with a strobe).

"Leon's Gun" also started off as a bit more futuristic four-barrelled design (still based on the COP .357), but was in the end simplified down to just use the gun without external modifications.

I would expect that if it get stats in the game at all, it will be as a (terrible) four-barrelled .357 Magnum hold-out gun, period — simply what the real-world shooting prop is, full stop.
That would be the only consistent conclusion, going from Ligan's approach to Deckard's blaster.

But ... yes indeed. Food for a separate thread.


EDIT:

Okay. They actually managed to go further than even I had anticipated.

Yes, "Leon's gun" is indeed a hold-out subcompact ... yes, it is indeed a four-barrelled Derringer ... yes, it is indeed in .357 calibre ... AND it fires two barrels at once, just as the filming prop was modified to do for visual effect!!

the most common back-up is a tiny four-barreled subcompact pistol, which packs a punch with two .357 round barrels firing at once

I mean, come ON! Has this fellow no independent imagination at all??
Last edited by Vader on Wed 22 Jun 2022, 09:15, edited 1 time in total.
Before you use the word "XENOMORPH" again, you should read this article through:

https://www.wired.co.uk/article/aliens-throwaway-line-confusion
 
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Vader
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Re: 2019-era LAPD Sidearm (aka. "Deckard's Blaster")

Wed 15 Jun 2022, 14:10

On the subject of the weapon's name though, I can't help but wonder...

Why on Earth does Ligan choose to crib Rick Ross' very non-canonical "PKD", when their own artwork clear as day shows the brands "STEYR-DAIMLER-PUCH A.G." and "STEYR MANNLICHER", complete with the classic Steyr logotype, on the weapon?

And if they now for some incomprehensible reason must use Rick's idea ... shouldn't a Swedish publisher at least be able to spell "Pfläger" correctly, without Americanising it?
Before you use the word "XENOMORPH" again, you should read this article through:

https://www.wired.co.uk/article/aliens-throwaway-line-confusion
 
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CreativeOctopus
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Re: 2019-era LAPD Sidearm (aka. "Deckard's Blaster")

Wed 15 Jun 2022, 22:44

From the perspective of a writer, I'm not a fan of turning the Blade Runner Blaster into a complex bit of kit that fires multiple types of rounds.

Blade Runner was a detective story set in the future, and threw in some thematic depth by questioning the morality of living as a paid executioner who kills constructs that are so realistic they need complex tests to determine if the thing they are interviewing is human or not.

If what gets published in the rulebook is overly techy, I'm going to ignore it. In my games it's just going to be a gun. Just because it's one of the best designed movie props of all time, doesn't make it a super weapon. It'll just be a regular police side-arm. You pull the trigger, it goes boom, and if you hit something, it dies.

Anything more and it'll take focus away from the investigations and how the drama effects the characters.
 
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Re: 2019-era LAPD Sidearm (aka. "Deckard's Blaster")

Thu 16 Jun 2022, 15:31

pp. 180-181: "PK-D 5223 BLASTER"

N.B.: This feedback mainly pertains to errors in movie continuity and consistency. If such matters are of little or no importance, you may safely disregard most of what's written in this post!

  • A crucial, basic point:
    This weapon only has a single barrel! Many seem to, in contradiction with clear visual evidence, assume it is double barrelled. It is not. A lot of the rest follows.


Multiple issues [with notes for sorted and remaining issues in the second PDF]:

  • Generally:
    [Remains] You know, y’all might — in my opinion, at least — have wanted to invest just a little more actual imagination and creativity into describing this iconic, futuristic weapon, than just verbatim calling out the 70’s real-world firearm parts the filming prop was built from — a 5-shot .44 revolver with parts from a .222 rifle bolted on.
    Especially bearing in mind that (a) those components are very thoroughly and deliberately hidden by the builders of the prop, and not meant to be recognised, and (b) most importantly — the spatial relations render the game’s notion physically impossible as a rationalisation in the first place (see 8th point below)!

    Image
    Main components of blaster prop — finished Blaster, complete action of Steyr Mannlicher .222 Mod. SL rifle (receiver w/ bolt, trigger assembly, magazine; chamber section of barrel visible), and a Charter Arms Bulldog .44 revolver. Note that bottom of rifle receiver and bolt are machined off on the prop to make room for the pyrotechnic effect (i.e. revolver barrel) and the whole chamber and barrel of the rifle are removed. The receiver part's ability to ever function as a rifle part is thereby completely obliterated. Clearly this must be rationalised as something else!
    Image may not show in all browsers. Try opening in separate tab or window.

    -
  • Header:
    PK-D
    [Remains/partially sorted] The name "Pfläger-Katsumata Series D" was originally created by superfan Rick Ross, as a brand name for his runs of Blaster prop replicas.
    The names were chosen to "accidentally" form Philip K. Dick's initials. Hardly canonical, and perhaps not appropriate to use, either; at least without giving proper credit. Also, note the umlauts in "Pfläger" in the first paragraph (sorted) and the table header on p.181 (remains).
    -
  • [Sorted!] While on the other hand, the top right line drawing clearly shows the weapon's manufacturer spelled out, in the Steyr "sight reticle" logotype and the brands "STEYR-DAIMLER-PUCH A.G." and "STEYR MANNLICHER" that the Steyr Mod. SL .222 rifle the prop's part comes from have engraved au naturelle.
    While both brand names are defunct since some years back — SDP dissolved in 2003; SM changed to "Steyr Arms" in 2019 — I'm not sure these are any easier to use... But just call it "S.D.P.", perhaps...?
    -
  • Header:
    5223
    [Sorted!] I applaud this!! Using the prop weapon's Steyr part's serial number as a model designation is a stroke of pure genius! However, the large image gets it wrong: it says "5224".
    -
  • First paragraph:
    Only Blade Runners are allowed to carry these versatile, powerful pistols.
    [Remains] In the original Blade Runner of 1982, many police men can be seen carrying identical weapons (on set, they all did; you just don't always see it on-screen). The implication being that this is the standard-issue LAPD sidearm, not a "Rep-Detect Special".
    If one wishes to rationalise them as different "series" of the weapon, it still needs to be accounted for that the uniformed officers pack iron with the same "detachable .222 rifle" part on top as the "Detective Special". Raising the question: what, then, is the difference between the "series"? The Rep-Detects need a "non-lethal sonic blaster"??
    Note also: the quote above states the weapon is a "pistol", while the game's description shows it as a revolver.
    -
  • Second paragraph:
    DOUBLE-SET TRIGGER
    [Remains] How can this possibly be a relevant feature on a weapon with a 4.2" barrel and no shoulder stock?
    -
  • Third paragraph:
    .44 10mm caseless
    [Sorted!] What is a ".44 10mm"? 0.44in is certainly not equal to 10mm, so … what’s it supposed to mean?
    -
  • Fourth paragraph:
    LONG-RANGE BARREL
    [Remains] Apart from the fact that this is not a feature ever referenced on-screen — the part the legend in the line drawings identifies as a "long-range barrel" has no chance of functioning as one, for several reasons. Consider eg. the action of the .222 bolt. The Steyr receiver is cut off right where the chamber would go — there is no room for a barrel! Consider also that Deckard is never seen using the weapon with the "detachable" rifle part off. Is he then always shooting rifle rounds?
    Apart from the fact that the "revolver" barrel all but completely cuts away the lower half of what would have been the .222 barrel anyway, rendering the whole proposition geometrically impossible!
    I strongly feel you'd be much better off rationalising the Steyr receiver as something other than a "detachable precision barrel".
    -
  • Fifth paragraph:
    SONIC ROUNDS
    [Remains/partially sorted] Another added feature, never referenced on-screen. As a side note, the idea of the Blaster having a non-lethal sonic function was originally a fan speculation for the function of the rifle receiver, as it terminates in a vaguely bell-shaped cavity. How would a rod-shaped sonic emitter like what the game proposes physically even work (sorted — but leaving the question, where is the sonic emitter? Does it shoot sound waves through the barrel? How is that supposed to work?)??
    And besides — would police in a Noir-type social setting even want a "non-lethal" complexity to their sidearms...?
    -
  • Fifth paragraph:
    The sonic cartridge must be activated by a switch on the right side of the housing unit
    [Remains] Why "keep" the unseemly switch? On the prop it's there just to turn the LEDs on and off. It's on a side of the prop never seen on-screen in close-up — for a reason! It's butt ugly, and sticks out like a sore thumb — and it's not supposed to "really" be there. So why put it there, when you have license to ignore it? I note that the image sort of glosses over it, too.
    -
  • Missing:
    [Remains] In the original Blade Runner of 1982, the scene at the climax of the movie where Deckard tries to ambush Roy, you can clearly see a small explosion at the point of the projectile's impact. A feature that would account for that explosion seems to be lacking in the description.
Before you use the word "XENOMORPH" again, you should read this article through:

https://www.wired.co.uk/article/aliens-throwaway-line-confusion

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