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Klas
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Communication advantages?

Tue 13 Feb 2018, 19:14

Do the rust brothers (or other groups) have any sort of communication advantage? Like, say, message bearing crows that always find the recipient.
 
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Brior
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Joined: Sat 09 Apr 2011, 10:59

Re: Communication advantages?

Tue 13 Feb 2018, 22:40

Klas wrote:
Do the rust brothers (or other groups) have any sort of communication advantage? Like, say, message bearing crows that always find the recipient.

That would be the raven sisters. Otherwise most have to trust traditional communication like bonfires or couriers. I did however suggest a magical, long distance communication artefact and also a way to simulate how to use it IRL since it's not that easy to understand.
 
Jizmack
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Re: Communication advantages?

Tue 13 Feb 2018, 23:04

Innate minor tele-empathy between the brothers, perhaps?
When one is in danger or distress the other senses it, even if very far apart.
So, if you attack one the other will immediately know and will show up soon... perhaps.
 
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Klas
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Re: Communication advantages?

Wed 14 Feb 2018, 00:38

Brior wrote:
That would be the raven sisters. Otherwise most have to trust traditional communication like bonfires or couriers. I did however suggest a magical, long distance communication artefact and also a way to simulate how to use it IRL since it's not that easy to understand.

I take it that this it not something ordinary brutes on a mission would be carrying around? :)
 
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Brior
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Re: Communication advantages?

Wed 14 Feb 2018, 09:00

Klas wrote:
Brior wrote:
That would be the raven sisters. Otherwise most have to trust traditional communication like bonfires or couriers. I did however suggest a magical, long distance communication artefact and also a way to simulate how to use it IRL since it's not that easy to understand.

I take it that this it not something ordinary brutes on a mission would be carrying around? :)

Nope. A one-of-a-kind-thing (well two-of-a-kind obviously). Magical tablets that mirror each other. I suggested that the players need to write in dry sand or in yoghurt dusted with cinnamon powder and let the reciever actually try to interpret the message to simulate the difficulties. I thought this was pretty neat, but of course that's me.
Actually I'm not so sure that seamless communication is a good idea since not having information often boosts suspense. Also we don't want characters moving around like zombies, eyes glued to a tablet, do we? ;-)
 
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9littlebees
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Re: Communication advantages?

Wed 14 Feb 2018, 09:12

Brior wrote:
Also we don't want characters moving around like zombies, eyes glued to a tablet, do we? ;-)

Hell no, especially when some players can't even keep their eyes off their own "magical tablets"!
I'm an English game designer working on Nordsaga, a career-focused dark Viking game, powered by the Year Zero engine: https://9littlebees.com
 
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King_Kull
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Re: Communication advantages?

Wed 14 Feb 2018, 09:31

Yes, that’s an annoying trend - okay, not new anymore but I hate it when the players or I are speaking and one or two players are looking at their magic mirrors. I have the feeling - if I‘m really correct I can’t say - that these players are not interested in the game. And of course this magic mirror viewing is very disrespectful.
I am king!
 
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9littlebees
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Re: Communication advantages?

Wed 14 Feb 2018, 09:47

King_Kull wrote:
Yes, that’s an annoying trend - okay, not new anymore but I hate it when the players or I are speaking and one or two players are looking at their magic mirrors. I have the feeling - if I‘m really correct I can’t say - that these players are not interested in the game. And of course this magic mirror viewing is very disrespectful.

Yeah, it's very disrespectful, but I don't think it's disinterest. They just don't realise what they're doing, and it's become a habit for so many people. They probably get that bloody device out on dates. That little thing keeps buzzing in their pocket, begging to be looked at.

The challenge (if they don't agree to keep the phone away in a bag or out of sight) is to keep the story engaging and moving quickly, especially combats.

The only game I've played where I didn't have players constantly checking their phones was Blades in the Dark (but only with 3 players). Because so much of that game (story, combat, everything - the GM doesn't even roll) is driven by the players, and we had a small group, it kept everyone's interest.

I think smaller group sizes (3-4) and true player-driven narrative are really important factors.

Unfortunately, my two groups are rather big...
I'm an English game designer working on Nordsaga, a career-focused dark Viking game, powered by the Year Zero engine: https://9littlebees.com
 
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King_Kull
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Re: Communication advantages?

Wed 14 Feb 2018, 10:54

I hate Smombies! ;)
My groups are encompassing five to six players. That's not easy to keep them all engaged at the same time. But one game is almost player driven and when they are discussing a plan, three players are constantly discussing and the other two are handling their magic mirrors most of the time. I have a rule that the use of the device should be reduced to a minimum but we're all adults and I'm not their Kindergärtner or teacher. And they are intrigued by the story as they have told me that. Not so easy to be the GM nowadays, where are the good old times?  :D
I am king!
 
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9littlebees
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Re: Communication advantages?

Wed 14 Feb 2018, 11:00

King_Kull wrote:
I hate Smombies! ;)
My groups are encompassing five to six players. That's not easy to keep them all engaged at the same time. But one game is almost player driven and when they are discussing a plan, three players are constantly discussing and the other two are handling their magic mirrors most of the time. I have a rule that the use of the device should be reduced to a minimum but we're all adults and I'm not their Kindergärtner or teacher. And they are intrigued by the story as they have told me that. Not so easy to be the GM nowadays, where are the good old times?  :D

I hear you.  Anyway, apologies for derailing your topic, Klas!
I'm an English game designer working on Nordsaga, a career-focused dark Viking game, powered by the Year Zero engine: https://9littlebees.com
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